The Anodyne Journal

Taking a Foam Impression

Posted by Billy Kanter on Apr 19, 2017 3:40:14 PM
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Diabetic_Foam_Impression.jpgThis week we are going to review how to properly cast a patient using an impression foam box for custom diabetic insoles. Casting patients is incredibly important, because it allows us here at Anodyne to make the best possible inserts for your patients. Below is a step by step breakdown on how to properly take a foot impression.

Step 1:

Have your patient seated in a chair, towards the front edge of the chair. Make sure they’re sitting at a 90-degree angle. Additionally, make sure the patient’s shoes are removed.

Step 2:

Open the impression foam box, and place the patient’s first foot onto the foam. Before you apply any pressure, make sure the patient’s foot is in the center of the foam.

Step 3:

With the foot centered on the foam, apply pressure to the top of the knee and dorsum of the foot, and push the foot into the impression foam. Once the foot is pushed in, use your fingers to push down the patient’s toes so the heel and metatarsal heads are at the same level.

Step 4:

Carefully remove the patient’s foot and repeat Steps 2-3 for the other foot

Step 5:

Visually inspect the impressions for both feet to determine you have the proper depth. If there are any special accommodations, offloards, metpads, metbars, etc., call them out on either the foam or the Custom Insert Order Form.

Step 6:

Complete the Custom Insert Order Form. Always make sure to include the patient’s name, account name, account number, patient weight, shoe size, shoe width, shoe style, special accommodations, and any other pertinent information you’d like our team here at Anodyne to know.

That’s it! That’s all it takes to properly cast a patient for Custom Diabetic Inserts. If you’re a more visual learner, below is a video outlining the steps above. As always, if you’re unsure of anything call our Customer Service Team, 844-637-4637, and we will be happy to walk you through anything.


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Foam Impression.jpg

Topics: Diabetic Footwear, Foot Care